1. Introduction

1. Introduction


As our school is a technological school, it is evident that we have many Wi-Fi routers around our school to help us connect to the Internet and access resources for learning, and that we are quite dependant on this connection. However, we have noticed that certain parts of the school have a much weaker connection than that of other areas. So we set up this experiment for our ISS Project in order to find out exactly where these “dead-zones” are, and perhaps discover more “dead-zones”, which would benefit the entire student population if we could use our results to find out which places to install a router at in order to ensure the whole school gets strong Wi-Fi coverage.


1.1 Research Questions 



How does Wi-Fi work?
  • It is an energy field that uses wireless radio waves to transmit data just like radios, cell phones and television.
  • A Wi-Fi connection is established using a wireless adapter to create hotspots - areas in the vicinity of a wireless router that are connected to the network and allow users to access internet services.
  • Once configured, WiFi provides wireless connectivity to your devices by emitting frequencies between 2.4GHz - 5GHz, based on the amount of data on the network.
  • (Brain, M., V.Wilson, T., & Johnson, B. (2001, April 30). Retrieved January 19, 2016, from http://computer.howstuffworks.com/wireless-network1.htm)

How do devices receive and send data from Wi-Fi?

  • For receiving data:
  • A computer will send a message to the router requesting for information from the internet. The router then receives the data from the internet and encrypts it and transmit it to the device which will then decode it for the information.
  • For sending data:


How can Wi-Fi signals be disrupted?
  • Other routers in the same densely-populated area can hinder the performance and coverage range of a Wi-Fi router
  • Objects can obstruct the signal being emitted from the router
  • Surrounding a router with a conductor of electricity can isolate the router from any connection (E.g. Faraday Cage)
  • (Retrieved January 19, 2016, from http://science.opposingviews.com/aluminum-foil-block-cell-phone-signals-2475.html)

     1.2 Hypothesis


D  Our Hypothesis:


The further you are from a device-populated Wi-Fi region, the faster the data transfer of your network connection is.

a) Aim / question being addressed

Aim: To find out how to increase overall network connectivity speed in SST.

Questions to be addressed:
  1. What is Wi-Fi?
  • It is a facility allowing devices like computers, smartphones to connect to the Internet wirelessly or to communicate with each other wirelessly.
  1. How does Wi-Fi work?
  • It is an energy field that uses wireless radio waves to transmit data just like radios, cell phones and television.
  1. How do devices receive and send data from Wi-Fi?
  • For receiving data:
  • A computer will send a message to the router requesting for information from the internet. The router then receives the data from the internet and encrypts it and transmit it to the device which will then decode it for the information.
  • For sending data:
  • A computer’s wireless adapter converts data into a radio signal and transmits it using the computer’s antenna to the wireless router which receives the signal and decodes to send the data to the Internet using a wired Ethernet connection.
(b) Independent variable

  1. Time [9am,12pm,3pm]
  2. Location [C1/2/3/4/5/Canteen x2/ Infohub x2/ Field/ Centre of ISH/ Centre of MPH/ Centre of Basketball Court]
  3. Day of The Week [Monday to Friday, Saturdays]

(c) Dependent variable
  1. Ping
  2. Download speed of Wi-Fi
  3. Upload speed of Wi-Fi
  4. Strength of Wi-FI signal

(d) Controlled variables

  1. Use the same phone for the whole project
  2. Have the same internet SSID for the whole project

*SSID: Name of the Wi-Fi server

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